Why Real Estate Agents Need to Stay Motivated and on Top of Their Market

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Why real estate agents need to stay motivated and on top of their market

Real estate is sales. No more and no less. You can go for months without selling anything and, naturally, be discouraged that you’ll ever succeed. Feast and famine is the order of the industry. So it is crucial that you break through this feeling to land your million dollar deal for the year. To land those deals you have to BELIEVE that you can do it – and that is why motivation is so important!

Motivation is also important for the following reasons:

a. Personality makes the sale!

Motivating yourself is essential because in real estate it is your personality, almost more than anything else, that counts. Reputation travels fast. Your success will hinge on word of mouth. Make a good impression and many more clients will want you to service them. That is why it is crucial that you feel on top of your field and that you remain confident in your abilities and skills, even when things don’t go as planned. Real estate can be hugely stressful – both for you and for your client. If a client leaves unhappy, whether it was due to your efforts or not, word-of-mouth spreads quickly and can affect your referral network and, ultimately, your bottom-line. Remain motivated!

b. Motivation gives you momentum!

Motivation pumps you up. Real estate is a feast and famine phenomenon. The famine part may be harder to sustain your energy for the feast. But the feast will come if you’re primed for it. That is why it is so important to retain your motivation so that you keep on enhancing your skills and so that you, somehow or other, manage to maintain your relish for your work. Motivated agents are more inclined to go the extra mile for their leads and clients, and the extra mile is always worth it.

c. You are self-employed

At the end of the day, you are running your own business – and that is precisely why motivation matters! As agent, you may work under a broker and the broker may provide you with marketing tools, education and mentoring, but, ultimately, you are responsible for your own results. It will be largely up to you to find the leads, manage them and close the deals. In short, you as agent are a business-person, an entrepreneur, self-employed and, like any self-employed individual, you will have to motivate yourself to keep your business going. In other words, the drive, determination, and self-discipline, must ultimately come from the agents themselves. And that is why it is so important for you to be self-motivated!

d. Motivation is one of the two most important skills!

Real estate hinges on knowledge. You’ll need to know your geographic locality inside out as well as going property prices and industry regulations. But, otherwise, the two most important factors are your personality and motivation. As regards personality, you’ll need to be gregarious, likeable, and you’ll need to possess excellent people skills. You’ll also need to have empathy in order to understand people’s situations and needs, so as to serve them best. Otherwise a positive attitude is crucial. Without that, you are at risk of defaulting on the first particularly since you’ll, likely, find the labor uphill work for you (especially in the beginning) and tend to be disheartened or frustrated. In that way, motivation underlies anything to do with real estate and is basically the corner-stone of your success.

Says Zurple, the real estate lead generation agency: Success in real estate relies on two main things – a great business strategy and a strong drive to succeed. If you’re missing one or the other, you will struggle. And if you have both – your’e on your way to success.

The bottom line is this…

Success in business, especially the real estate industry isn’t the 100 meter dash – it is a marathon. Maintaining a steady level of motion can be tricky, but it’s your main – if not your only – way to success.

Here are three tips that can help you:

  1. Recognize your progress: Take it slow and pat yourself on the back for those minor victories. Congratulate yourself for staying on task and for completing all those incremental steps that were so necessary for closing the deal.
  2. Find yourself a successful mentor: In the cutthroat industry of real estate finding someone excellent to help you can be laborious. Avoid brokers who are ready to hire you for fees. Take your time in finding someone who is a good match for you, who is honest and who has your best interests in mind so that he. or she, will give you the time and guidance that you need.
  3. Organize your time well: Set aside time to speak to clients, review industry reports and statistics, attend meetings, and see to all the other variables that go into the real estate schedule. Improve your skills as you go. Don’t avoid tasks that you don’t like. Be self-disciplined. Look to the future – don’t dwell on your failures; learn from them.

And one more thing…

Get and stay motivated!

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Source by Yanni A Raz

What Does ("PID") Mean in The Real Estate Industry?

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A Public Improvement District (“PID”) is a financing tool created by the Public Improvement District Assessment Act as found in Chapter 372 of the Texas Local Government Code. The PID enables any city to levy and collect special assessments on property that is within the city or within the city’s Extraterritorial Jurisdiction (“ETJ”). A county may also form a PID,but must obtain approval from a city if the proposed PID is within the city’s ETJ. The PID establishes a mechanism to finance improvement projects through the issuance of bonds secured by special assessments levied on all benefited properties. Because PID bonds can be used to reimburse the developer for eligible infrastructure early in the development process, often before the closing of the first home.

Public Improvements Eligible for PID Financing are; Acquisition of Right of Ways, Art, Creation of pedestrian malls, Erection of foundations, Landscaping and other aesthetics, Library, Mass transit, Parks & Recreational or Cultural Facilities, Parking, Street and sidewalk. Supplemental safety services for the improvement of the district, including public safety and security services. Supplemental business-related services for the improvement of the district. Water, wastewater, health and sanitation or drainage.

Benefits of a PID

A PID may be established early in the development process allowing the developer to be a reimbursed upon completion of the public infrastructure. Furthermore, unlike a Municipal Utility District (“MUD”), Water Control and Improvement District (“WCID”), or Fresh Water District (“FWSD”), PIDs do not require TCEQ approval, and are governed by the governing body of the city or county, thereby alleviating concerns regarding board turnover and the integrity of the board. If the city chooses to annex property that is within the boundaries of a PID, the city is not forced to pay off the assessments, and the assessments do not affect the city’s debt capacity or rating.

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Source by John Foreman

Preparing To Sell Your Home: 5 Steps

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When you purchased the home, you are currently residing in, you probably made some personal commitment, and developed a personal, emotional relationship. For whatever reason, you have now, recognized, and believe, it’s time to sell your house, and relocate. However, since for most people, their house represents their single – largest, financial asset, doesn’t it make sense, to proceed, in the wisest, most responsible way, in order to achieve the best results? If you make this decision, begin by being, as prepared, as possible, and proceeding in a wise way. With that in mind, this article will attempt to briefly consider, identify, review and discuss, 5 steps, which are a well – considered way, to proceed.

1. Check your title: Consider your property, and find out, if there are any outstanding issues, that might create challenges, to transferring a clean title, when you sell your house. These may include: building permits, which were never closed – out properly; work done, without proper permits; any property – line impingements, which might be problematic; tax or other liens; etc.

2. Look objectively, not emotionally: It’s often difficult for homeowners to objectively evaluate their properties, which is one of the essential reasons, to hire the right real estate professional, who might look, with an objective – eye! We all develop some degree of emotional attachment to our home, but it’s important to recognize, those wonderful moments, and significant, life cycle, experiences, while invaluable to you, add no value, to potential buyers. Your real estate agent should provide you, with a professionally designed, Competitive Market Analysis, or CMA, in order to price your home right/ correctly, from the start!

3. What would you be willing to pay, and why?: Ask yourself, introspectively, objectively, and honestly, if you were a buyer, looking at your house, what would you be willing to pay, and why? Consider the strengths and weaknesses, and how it compares with other houses, for – sale, in your local real estate market! A smart way to begin, is to look at some of the competition, and objectively compare!

4. Address needs and weaknesses: Once you identify the needs, weaknesses, and flaws, your house has, in terms of how others, might perceive it, address these in a smart, rational, productive manner.

5. Hire the right real estate agent: Interview several real estate agents, and consider, what each, might offer, which might best benefit you! Overlook the rhetoric and promises, and don’t be swayed, but anyone, who over – states, his suggested listing price. Rather, be certain, the professional you hire, is someone, who you feel comfortable with, will be empathetic, responsive, responsible, and have a marketing plan, for your specific home.

Properly prepare to sell your home, and you will be best – served! Protect your best interests, as well as financial ones!

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Source by Richard Brody

Six Economic Principles of Real Estate Valuation

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Real estate valuation is the process of estimating a single price one would realistically pay to own a particular property. The method for residential property valuation that is most familiar to brokers and agents, of course, is the comparative market analysis (or, CMA). This property valuation process involves an estimate of value based upon the sale prices for other similar properties (or comparables) within the local market area, and/or other similar markets.

When preparing a CMA, a minimum of three recently sold comparable properties and three comparable properties currently for sale, are typically chosen to infer the price of the subject property. Differences between the comparable properties and the subject property are evaluated to add or reduce value in the analysis, and to estimate a fair market value of the subject property by using a comparison approach.

Valuation of commercial properties (i.e. office buildings, apartment buildings, single family communities, and plots of land) is largely influenced by various principles of economics. These principles are not usually factored into the typical CMA report for residential properties. The objective of this article is to shed some light on these principles in because they can be applied to any property valuation effort. They are the basis of our focus in this discussion as we look at and summarize six applied economic principles that can help give you an idea of the impact they can have on the value of a property.

1) Anticipation

This is the expectation of future benefits. In other words, real estate investors measure the value of real estate investment based on the anticipated future income stream generated by the property. They are more likely to value a property on the income it generates rather than the perceived market value inferred by a comparative analysis, or the construction and land costs required to replace the property. The expected, or anticipated, income generation capabilities of the asset is the primary focus.

This approach is not a surprise to those that have some understanding of commercial real estate investing; However, it is not common knowledge to the average property owner or buyer. The focus on purchasing anticipated cash flows can help expand the understanding of value in residential properties as well. For example, instead of thinking “how much is the property worth now”, also think, “how much return would I purchased the property and rented it later”. In a competitive environment, this approach and knowledge can make all the difference.

2) Conformity

This is defined as the need for reasonable similarity and compatibility in a given location. Compatible land uses, for instance, may generate higher values than those with limitations imposed upon the property due to location.

For example, an apartment complex located in a primarily residential area will most likely have more value than one located in a highly industrial area. Savvy commercial real estate investors are keen to this concept, while many residential home buyers may not pay close attention to adjacent or nearby land uses. Taking a broader view of surrounding uses can provide a deeper understanding of value, or perceived value, from an investment perspective.

3) Supply and Demand

This principal encompasses both the scarcity, and the demand for the subject property. Although investment real estate with similar physical and economic characteristics can sell for similar prices, real estate valuation can be greatly affected (higher or lower) within a market that lacks reasonable balance between supply and demand.

For example, land in a metropolitan area where undeveloped land is scarce, would demand greater value than land in a rural area with large parcels of vacant land. Likewise, an apartment complex selling at a time when there is more than enough supply to meet the rental demand, would have less value to a real estate investor than the same complex during a time when the supply of apartments in the area is lower and does not appropriately meet the demand.

4) Highest and Best Use

This is an important concept that relates to the highest possible use, and the best possible use of a property, as opposed to its current use. In other words, when it is legally possible, appropriately compatible, physically possible and financially viable to modify the use of a property, the value of the same property can be significantly increased.

For example, an office building can be enlarged to add more rentable office space or a retail on the first floor; or, an apartment complex can add more units or add mixed use features to the community enhancing its value.

Commercial real estate investors and developers use this principle to create value and to enhance cash flow. The principle can also be used in residential real estate when a buyer or owner of a residential property evaluates the highest and best use of the land per the municipal zoning and building codes, and considers adding or expanding the property’s features and characteristics to enhance its value.

5) Contribution

This, essentially, means that the value of an income property can be impacted when it is physically, legally, and economically feasible to contribute more space to the property at a cost equal to, or less than, the marginal revenue that it generates. In other words, when value added offsets the cost of making the contribution or investment. In contrast to the principle of Highest and Best Use, this principle compares revenues or value to the benefits that the investment or contribution may produce. The question to ask after you’ve identified the highest and best use of your property is, does the investment or contribution required to achieve the highest and best use for the property make financial sense, or is it justifiable. You can add features to a home such as a pool and a deck, and you can add units to a multifamily building; The contribution question is, “will you be able to sell the home for the added value that you perceive you are creating, or will the new apartment units rent?”

6) Substitution

This is an opportunity cost concept. In other words, a rational real estate investor will not pay mor for an investment property than what the next best substitute with similar levels of risk will yield in financial benefit. For the residential buyer, owner or investor this means, examine all other options well. Often, residential home buyers fall in love with the first or second home they see, and can easily forego better opportunities as a result. This principle suggests evaluating and comparing numerous opportunities in the market before making a decision.

The six principles mentioned in this article are intended as an overview, to give you an idea of how other economic factors can affect the valuation of properties. While these principles are demonstrated in commercial real estate valuation, they also affect residential properties and should be observed when analyzing the value of any real estate property.

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Source by Ricky Trinidad

The Characteristics Of The Real Estate Market

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The real estate market is the economic sector that involves the buying and selling of infrastructure such as buildings either for residential purposes, business premises, and the industry segment. Like any business sector it is susceptible to the economic forces of supply and demand. The main people involved in this field include the owner, renter, developers, renovators, and the facilitators.

This sector has a number of characteristics that are specific to it. Real estate is durable since the buildings can last for many years while the land it stands on is indestructible. As a result the supply is composed of a large share of already pre-existing stock and a tiny percentage of new development. Thus the stock varies in price only according the deterioration, renovation, and the new development coming up.

Stock in this sector could be referred as heterogeneous since every piece is unique. All buildings are different in terms of the location they are situated in, their structure and design as well as how they are financed. Change in this field takes quite a long time. This is as a result of the long duration involved in financing and construction of new property.

The real estate has the very unique feature in terms of the buyers in this market. The property can be purchased either as an investment with the expectation of earning returns or as a consumption good with the thought of using it. Individuals could also invest in the market for both reasons whereby they use the property for a while before selling it at a profit. As a direct result of its dual nature, there is a high demand since individuals tend to over-invest in this sector.

Immobility is yet another characteristic unique to this sector. The properties as well as the land it lies on are both immobile. As a result there is no physical market place meaning one has to go to where the property is situated. Therefore this issue makes location a prime factor before investment.

The main factor in demand for property is demographic, that is the population size and growth. The demographic composition plays a huge role in determining the demand and as a result the price. The performance of the economy also affects the performance of the sector since it plays a role in the ability of investors to take loans and mortgages for financing their business ventures. Naturally, the pricing determines the level of demand in the sector.

There are a number of ways to finance investment in the real estate market from government and commercial institutions. Financial aid can be obtained from commercial banks, savings banks, mortgage brokers, life insurance companies and other financial institutions. However, the best practice still remains getting funding from your own savings.

In view of the recent real estate market crash it is best to follow some guidelines. As a buyer ensure that the price you pay for the property matters a lot as well as the ability to dispose of the purchase later down the road. If not it is advisable to downsize your mortgage to be on the safe side. As a seller, identify when it is the right time to put your property on the market in order to avoid low offers.

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Source by Kevin Elvis Johnson